The floods of Iowa: in pictures


 AP Photo/Jeff Roberson

The rising Mississippi River has broken high-water records up and down the Iowa and Illinois shore, cresting as high as 12 feet above flood stage in some places. Estimates place the cost of the damage at over $1 billion dollars, and concerns are rising over crop damage, toxic remnants that were washed into neighborhoods, future mosquito invasions, and maintaining supplies of clean drinking water.

See more incredible images here.

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This entry was posted in Climate change, Extreme weather, Photography, Rural communities, US and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to The floods of Iowa: in pictures

  1. the Grit says:

    Hi,

    It’s pretty bad. Of course, it’s also what people who live in a flood plain should expect. Interestingly enough, all the flood control measures that work in normal years, have acted to make this years floods worse. Most interestingly though, at least to me, is that the only reason the population in flood prone areas is so high is because of Government meddling by way of subsidized flood insurance. Along that line, we also have another disaster of even larger potential just waiting to happen – when the Big Quake hits Los Angeles that is massively over populated because our Government makes earthquake insurance affordable. That’ll make Katrina hitting New Orleans look like a spa weekend.

    the Grit

  2. matt says:

    The more I hear about US subsidies in all walks of American life the more I realise the US economic system ain’t that far off Cuba’s. 🙂

  3. the Grit says:

    Hi matt,

    It’s not that bad; more like England’s 🙂 Seriously, subsidies are one of our biggest National problems and, even worse, they’re one of the things our news media fails to cover. The other big problem is our Government’s use of tax breaks to control public behavior. Both of these, by the way, are un-Constitutional. Not to worry though; we’re over due for a revolution and that should straighten things out, one way or the other. Of course, that means we won’t be there to keep the wolves from your door, and in the worst case we may be the wolves after we get tired of shooting each other, so y’all might want to build up your military a bit.

    the Grit

  4. matt says:

    Evidence of impending ‘revolution’ please. Not reasons for but evidence of. 🙂

  5. the Grit says:

    Hi matt,

    As you might know, we are a very sharply divided country where politics are concerned. On one hand we have a massive population that lives in a tiny bit of space in a few overly large cities. These people, over the last few decades, have completely lost touch with the rest of the country. Google up a state map of our recent elections, and you’ll find that, by land area, something like 80% of the country voted one way, but the elections by population were extremely close. Since the last big election four years ago, the population balance has shifted enough that a majority of our people now live in large urban areas. It’s projected that this will give an overwhelming election result to our liberal party, which has promised to make changes that are totally unacceptable to most people living outside the big cities.

    Our first Civil War was sparked by very similar circumstances, when the industrialized Northern States tried to impose their will on the more agricultural Southern States. That time, the issue was States’ rights versus Federal control, and since the relatively small North had more population, they forced their will on the rest of the country to gain political advantage. This time, the over populated cities are doing the same thing, and it’s difficult to see how the result won’t be the same. Of course, this time there’s no way the majority can win, given their lack of resources and military power. Still, a few years of arrogant authoritative abuse by the majority, will push enough people over the edge into rebellion, and the leaders on the liberal side are crazy enough not to see the danger.

    Hope I’m wrong but afraid I’m not,
    the Grit

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